Practice every Tense in English Grammar

On this page, you’ll find a series of videos to help you practice every tense in English grammar. The basic idea of these videos is that you work your way around a tense chart changing the tense of the verb as you go. These videos are all silent to allow you to really focus on what you are saying rather than what I’m saying. If you prefer to have some sound around you, put on your favourite music!

Using the Active Voice Tenses in English Grammar

The tense chart for the active voice is divided into three columns and four rows. Along the top, you’ll see the time – past, present and future, while down the side, you’ll see the four forms that the action can take – simple, continuous, perfect simple and perfect continuous. For each square, you’ll identify the positive, question, and negative form of the sentence.

Tense Chart – Active Voice

Positive Sentences

When we put our sentence into the square that identifies a past time and a simple action, we have a moment to say what we think the sentence should be as a positive statement. The plus symbol soon disappears to reveal the correct answer – “We bought presents“.

Questions

Next, the sentence disappears to reveal a question prompt. We have a moment to say what we think the question should be as a simple action in the past time. Soon, that symbol disappears, revealing the correct form of the question. – “Did we buy presents?”.

Negative Sentences

Next, the question disappears to reveal a negative sentence prompt. We have a moment to say what we think the negative sentence should be as a simple action in the past time. Soon, that symbol disappears, revealing the correct form of the sentence. – “We did not buy presents“.

Using the Passive Voice Tenses in English Grammar

The tense chart for the passive voice is divided into three columns and three rows because we don’t usually use the continuous form of the perfect tenses.

As the sentence moves around the tense board you’ll identify the sentence in its positive, question, and then negative form.

Tense Chart – Active Voice

Positive Sentences

When we put our sentence into the square that identifies a present time and a perfect simple action, we have a moment to say what we think the sentence should be as a positive statement. The plus symbol soon disappears to reveal the correct answer – “Books have been carried“.

Questions

Next, the sentence disappears to reveal a question prompt. We have a moment to say what we think the question should be as a perfect simple action in the present time. Soon, that symbol disappears, revealing the correct form of the question. – “Have books been carried?”.

Negative Sentences

Next, the question disappears to reveal a negative sentence prompt. We have a moment to say what we think the negative sentence should be as a perfect simple action in the present time. Soon, that symbol disappears, revealing the correct form of the sentence. – “Books have not been carried“.

An Overview of the Tense Chart – Nouns

The tense chart for nouns in the active voice is divided into three columns and four rows.

As the sentence moves around the tense board you’ll identify the sentence in its positive, question, and then negative form.

Tense Chart – Nouns

Positive Sentences

When we put our sentence into the square that identifies a past time and a perfect simple action, we have a moment to say what we think the sentence should be as a positive statement. The plus symbol soon disappears to reveal the correct answer – “They have eaten pizza“.

Questions

Next, the sentence disappears to reveal a question prompt. We have a moment to say what we think the question should be as a perfect simple action in the past time. Soon, that symbol disappears, revealing the correct form of the question. – “Have they eaten pizza?”.

Negative Sentences

Next, the question disappears to reveal a negative sentence prompt. We have a moment to say what we think the negative sentence should be as a perfect simple action in the past time. Soon, that symbol disappears, revealing the correct form of the sentence. – “They have not eaten pizza“.

An Overview of the Tense Chart – Adjectives

The tense chart for adjectives in the active voice is divided into three columns and three rows because we don’t really use the perfect continuous form with adjectives.

As the sentence moves around the tense board you’ll identify the sentence in its positive, question, and then negative form.

Tense Chart – Adjectives

Positive Sentences

When we put our sentence into the square that identifies a present time and a continuous action, we have a moment to say what we think the sentence should be as a positive statement. The plus symbol soon disappears to reveal the correct answer – “Joe is being critical about my work“.

Questions

Next, the sentence disappears to reveal a question prompt. We have a moment to say what we think the question should be as a continuous action in the present time. Soon, that symbol disappears, revealing the correct form of the question. – “Is Joe being critical about my work?”.

Negative Sentences

Next, the question disappears to reveal a negative sentence prompt. We have a moment to say what we think the negative sentence should be as a continuous action in the present time. Soon, that symbol disappears, revealing the correct form of the sentence. – “Joe is not being critical about my work“.

Using Questions with Tenses in English Grammar

The tense chart for question words in the active voice is divided into four columns and three rows. As the sentence moves around the tense board you’ll identify the sentence in 6 forms – its positive, question, and then negative form both with and without the question word.

Tense Chart – Question Words

Positive Sentences

When we put our sentence into the square that identifies a present time and a continuous action, we have a moment to say what we think the sentence should be as a positive statement without the question word. The plus symbol soon disappears to reveal the correct answer – “They are going to the shop“.

Next, you’ll see a question word prompt asking you to use the question word in a positive sentence. The prompt soon disappears to reveal the correct answer – “I know where they are going.”

Questions

When the positive statement prompt disappears, it will be replaced by a question prompt. You’ll have a moment to say what you think the question should be as a continuous action in the present time. Soon, that symbol disappears, revealing the correct form of the question. – “Are they going to the shop?”.

Next, you’ll see a question word prompt asking you to use the question word in a question. You’ll need to invert your subject and verb here! The prompt soon disappears to reveal the correct answer – “Where are they going.”

Negative Sentences

Moving on to the negative sentences, you’ll soon see a negative sentence prompt. You’ll have a moment to say what you think the negative sentence should be as a continuous action in the present time. Soon, that symbol disappears, revealing the correct form of the sentence. – “They are not going to the shop“.

And finally, you’ll see a question word prompt asking you to use the question word in a negative statement. Remember not to invert your subject and verb! The prompt soon disappears to reveal the correct answer – “I don’t know where they are going.”

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